The Revitalization of the Land Commission and Reform of our Fourth Level of Government

Three years after the Land Commission Act was passed the provincial government changed. The new administration removed critical elements in the visionary land policy. It’s time we put them back.

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Premiers of British Columbia: Dave Barrett (1973 – 1975); Bill Bennett (1976-1986); William Bennett (1952 – 1972)

The Laws of Economics know no censure. When House Prices in the GVRD—the corporate name for ‘Metro Vancouver’ per letters patent (12 June 1974)—rose by 12-times over 30 years the Laws of Economics admit but a single primary cause: In the GVRD the supply of land has been overly restricted.

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Metro Vancouver Mayors: What Went Wrong

80% of the Metro Mayors were either fired at the last elections or simply chose not to show up for work. What happened?

PICTURED ABOVE: FORTY-FIVE YEARS LATER THE ALR (THE AGRICULTURAL LAND RESERVE) REMAINS A SOURCE OF CONTENTION.

It was all supposed to be strategic.’ We would build towers-and-skytrain and stop climate change. We got the towers and we built the skytrain. Yet, it will be the Teslas that set us on the path to end pollution and put solar panels on every rooftop. The towers-and-skytrain, what did that get us? Housing prices 12-times over median household incomes. People at the polls on 20 October this year had two questions in mind: What went wrong? How will we fix it?

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The Commodification of the Modern Corporate Woman in the Vancovuerism

The image of Isis has always functioned in Western Culture as the vehicle for laying our collective and subliminal undercurrents bare for all to see.

Rumoured Apple Corporation’s new headquarters in Vancouver BC have come complete with the image of the work space reproduced above and analyzed below.

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Metro Mayors Council Routed in Civic Elections

With 80% of the Metro Mayors either defeated at the polls or opting not to stand for re-election, should their Transit Plan be reopened by new Mayors with a new mandate?

Sixteen of twenty mayors in Metro Vancouver will not be returning to their posts after the 20 October 2018 municipal elections. There can only be one explanation:

After 32 years of building skytrain-and-towers the cost of housing has gone from being at-par with median house-hold incomes to now being 12-times higher.

The people demand to know what is going on…

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The Transportation Transect

The Transportation Transect shows the reach of transit technologies into the urban footprint. It also points the way towards achieving cities with a zero-carbon footprint.

We can map all the transportation technologies in use today on the rural-to-urban transect defined by Andres Duany using Patrick Gedes‘s Valley Section (1909) as a model.

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Trudeau Moves Canada into Cap-and-Trade

The real deal will be in the details.

Premier Justin Trudeau announced today that the Federal Government will ‘tax’ emissions in provinces that do not have their own plans ‘because pollution crosses borders’. Affected are: Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and New Brunswick.

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TTN: The Transit Network

One of the reasons to build a Regional Transit Nework is to solve transportation problems. The other is to expand the supply of ‘horizontal’ build out to fix the ‘other’ problem—the crushing housing crisis that engulfs the region.

Update—October 2018: Douglas McCallum Comes Back as Mayor in Surrey Complete with a Council Majority announces he will build Skytrain to Langley for the cost of LRT. 

The campaign promises of Surrey’s new Mayor don’t align with either the Transit Network or the Transit Pyramid  that informs it. Modern Tram, not Skytrain, tops the Transit Pyramid. Modern Tram has 3-times more capacity than Skytrain, yet is 10-times cheaper to build. Like the Pyramid, the Transit Network runs on the surface where the gains accrue to the people in the neighborhoods rather than the tower developers. Will the new Mayor achieve greater gains for his community building 17.5 km of Skytrain or 175 km of Modern Tram? Will he focus his efforts exclusively on public safety and transit? Or will he also tackle the housing crisis?

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